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How to Give Metal a Rich Vintage Patina

I promised last week when I shared my vintage file cabinet makeover that I would share a tutorial…

A bit of background for you (since I believe everything should have a story behind it!): my church is renovating an old office building which had lots of really solid, old-school file cabinets.  Rather than throw them out, we decided to refinish them to go with the industrial-chic, utilitarian sort of style that the new building will have.  As there were 20 cabinets to update, I am SO glad to say that I had some help from other women in the church, but I did want to have a process in place before we all got together…  So I brought one of the extras home (yay for free furniture!) to experiment on.

Note: My cabinet started black.  If you cabinet starts another color, your process may differ… (If starting gunmetal gray, for example, try this technique for a vintage, industrial, brushed-steel look instead.)

Here are the necessary supplies:

  • 220 grit sandpaper
  • damp rag
  • Annie Sloan chalk paint in Graphite
  • lint-free rag (like an old t-shirt)
  • paste wax
  • Briwax dark wax
  • silver craft paint
  • buffing rag

Here is the process I developed:
Step 1: Sand down entire piece lightly with 220 grit sandpaper.
I used a sanding block and did it by hand, but a palm sander would have been quicker.  Do not use a circular sander (which is all I had on hand at the time) because it will leave circles in your paint.  The point here is to simply remove the sheen, not the color.

If you follow me on instagram (and if you don’t, you can do so here), you saw my disease-ridden dust-covered arm from the process… Moral of the story: DO IT OUTSIDE.

Step 2: Lightly paint with ASCP graphite.
I know that ASCP doesn’t officially require sanding, but I wanted to be sure the paint would really adhere.  If you don’t have ASCP on hand (or it’s not in the budget), I would imagine that homemade chalk paint in a dark dark gray would do the trick, as well.

Step 3: Using your old t-shirt, lightly wipe the paint just as it begins to dry.
This step will provide the most different results depending on the person…  I wanted to sort of rub the paint into the sanded metal, and I wanted the black underneath to show through in some places.  I found that a random swiping of the paint in various directions gave me just enough variation. Here you can see the body painted and wiped (in contrast to the drawer which had been neither sanded nor painted).

Step 4: Mix paste wax with Briwax dark wax (1:1 ratio) and add a squirt of silver craft paint.
Because we had 20 cabinets to redo for church and saving money was a major goal, we decided to cut cost by mixing paste wax (a much cheaper wax than AS or other boutique brands of soft wax) with Briwax.  Briwax runs $15-20/can and is a VERY soft wax (liquid above 65 degrees), so the combination of Briwax and paste wax create a nice, soft, paintable dark wax.  The squirt of silver craft paint is to give it that slight sparkle.  I probably only used a dime size of craft paint for every 1/2 cup of wax – just a little touch.

Step 5: Wax the entire piece, using your brush to smudge the paint where desired.
I know that sounds horribly vague, but wax can actually lift paint, so I purposefully worked my wax into the piece with significant pressure in some places to further add to the dimension and contrast of the black and gray portions.  That effect can be taken even further if you follow your brush with a rag in some places.  Here you can see the difference the wax makes (top half waxed, bottom half not).

Step 6: Buff and repeat wax if desired.

I also added new hardware to my cabinet.  Unfortunately, I found it enormously difficult to find cup pulls with 4″ spacing at a reasonable price (I finally ordered these if you’re curious).  And then when they arrived, the finish didn’t match the label holders or lock mechanism perfectly (I had assumed they probably wouldn’t), so I touched up all of them with a little silver rub ‘n buff just to even out the finishes.

In the end, though the cabinet was free, I spent ~$30 on the hardware.  And if I hadn’t already had the other supplies for the church project, they could have added up quickly… But I LOVE the result.  Don’t you?

I think it would be beautiful on any old metal cabinet.  The options are endless!

(I’m excited to be sharing this project at East Coast Creative as an entry for the Creating with the Stars contest.  Wish me luck!)

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Sharing at: Home Stories A to ZSavvy Southern StyleJennifer RizzoMy Repurposed Life, and these other fabulous parties!

Comments

  1. I like the pulls and the color is great! Your desk is amazing…what a nice work space!

  2. What an inspirational space! Thanks for the great tips!

  3. I LOVE this idea! Your technique turned out great!

  4. Katie Bourg says:

    This is just what I’ve been looking for! When you say Briwax dark wax, do you mean the dark brown or the ebony? Can’t wait to get started on my project :)

    • Rachel Paxton says:

      It was the dark brown, Katie. I’m so glad you like the makeover, and I hope you love the piece you’re working on!! :)

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